Doodoo Wah

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In loving memory of Ron DeLacy who lost his battle with cancer in July of 2013, Doodoo Wah is unloading their CDs at LESS THAN HALF PRICE. All of them are going for $7. Yep, seven dollars. And shipping is also cut in half: One buck per item.

To order, go here.




All About Doodoo Wah

They made fun, they made music, and they made radio commercials that people actually enjoyed. They were Doodoo Wah.

From their homes in the old Gold Rush town of Columbia, CA, to bluegrass and folk festivals, theaters, bars, streets and radio stations across the country, Doodoo Wah poked fun at Bob Dole, both George Bushes, Bill Clinton, Dan Quayle, Lorena Bobbitt, Christmas, middle-aged men, loggers and anti-loggers, contractors, dentists, lawyers, Dr. Kevorkian, Mike Tyson, Japanese car-makers and much more.

But it was -- and still is, if you own their CDs --  all easy on the ear, delivered with tasteful and not spiteful humor. And it streams out amid endearing harmonies, catchy melodies, rhythms and riffs that keep "Doodoo Heads" tapping their toes when they aren't slapping their thighs.

Ron DeLacy and Dave Cavanagh teamed up as Doodoo Wah in 1990, parlaying DeLacy's self-deprecating wit, Cavanagh's instrumental wizardry and both of their gifts and enthusiasm for making music.

Soon they were booked up and down California's Mother Lode and in Nevada. Since then their popularity has spread to Alaska, Hawaii, Nashville, the Midwest and points in between.

They co-produced six "Doodoo Wah" albums, and some of their songs have been covered by Curb-Capitol's Ray Stevens ("Working for the Japanese"), Warner Brothers' Pinkard and Bowden ("Since My Baby Turned Gay" and "Long-a-Sing") and Dr. Elmo of Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer fame ("Dr. Kevorkian").

Among other Doodoo Wah originals: "Hanky Panky in the White House," "Nixon in '96," "The Men's Crisis Center," "Odor in the Court" (about an attorney's courtroom flatulence) and "The Big Five-O" (an old-timey rouser on growing older).

On their second album (For Amusement Only) they included their first serious song, "Brother Jol," as if to keep Doodoo Heads wondering what might be next. The answer has been more fun and more music -- Doodoo Wah And Then Some, released in 1995, Doodoo Wah LIVE!, which came out in 1997, and their fifth CD, called Doodoo Wah 5.0, in 2000, and in 2005 their sixth, called Deep Six.

The "Live" album is sold out, but all of the others are still available at the drastically reduced price.



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